News

June 23, 2017 – Artslant


EXPAT
, R/SF projects, May 12 – June 4, 2017, installation view

ARTIST MIGRATIONS FROM SF TO LA ARE SHAPING WEST COAST AESTHETICS AND IDENTITY

by Leora Lutz

On this particular Saturday in May, it’s unusually quiet in the Tenderloin as I walk from BART up Larkin Street. The San Francisco neighborhood is known for its seedy characteristics, its history of vice, homelessness, happy ending massage parlors, strip clubs, dive bars, single occupancy hotels, and social service centers. Today it feels like a level of caring has taken place, with some new businesses now occupying previously vacant storefronts—the rawness is still there, it just doesn’t feel as bedraggled and dangerous. Maybe it’s the heat—a blazing 65 degrees that feels like 80 by our SF standards.

Click here to read the full article: artslant.com


May 12 – June 4, 2017 – R/SF projects


Helene XII
, 2017
Archival pigment transfer on perforated projection screen
25 x 18 inches

EXPAT

May 12 – June 4, 2017
Opening Reception: Friday, May 12, 7-10pm

Petra Cortright
Julie Henson
Bailey Hikawa
Greg Ito
Matt Lipps
Peter Wu
Jake Ziemann

R/SF projects
1050 Larkin St, San Francisco, CA 94109
rsfprojects.com


March 7, 2017 – The Creators Project – VICE

Rise of the Fly II at the Vincent Price Art Museum

Reviewed by Shana Nys Dambrot

The Creators Project – VICE


March 17 – April 29, 2017 – galerie l’inlassable 


Untitled (Planet of the Vapes)
, 2017
Archival pigment print on vape, polyurethane foam sconce
11.25 x 4 x 3.5 inches

MICRO SALON #7

On the occasion of the sixty years of the Micro Salon, galerie l’inlassable celebrates the legacy of Iris Clert, the visionary Parisian art dealer. Two exhibitions, held simultaneously in the window-space of rue Dauphine as well as in the stable of the Rue de Nevers will therefore bring together sixty artists ranging from historical works by Iris Clert’s roster such as Arman, Fontana, Klein or Tinguely, to international emerging artists.

galerie l’inlassable
13, rue de Nevers, 75006 Paris
18, rue Dauphine, 75006 Paris
galerielinlassable.com


January 13, 2017 – NET GALLERY


Helene II
, 2016; Archival pigment print, 25×18 inches, edition 1/5 + 2AP

STROBE
Opening Reception: Friday, January 13,, 6-9pm

Sarah Gail Amstrong | Braiden Bellamy | Anastasia Davydova | Rod Fahmian
Isabelle Harada | Sterling Hedges | Alex Hutchiwood | Michael John Kelly
Emmet Methven | Victor Vasarely | Son | Peter Wu
Organized by Son Vo (Net Gallery) and Nick Zhu

These days, it’s easy come, easy go.

I press the command and space buttons simultaneously on the keyboard with my left ring and middle finger, up pops a search window with the blinking ‘|’ vertical bar text cursor. I enter ‘strobe’. The matching results appear. At the very top is a bookmarked webpage made in the 2000-aughts, William Gibson’s 1993 ‘Virtual Light’. I click on it and it opens up in a browser window, where I do another search: ‘strobe’. I jump to the first of four instances, to the chapter ‘Cruising with Gunhead’ and copy and paste that paragraph:

“Rydell slung Gunhead up onto a verge covered in dusty ice-plant, doing seventy past a museum-grade Bentley, and on the wrong side at that. Eyeblink of a woman passenger’s horrified face, then Sublett must have managed to slap the red plastic plate that activated the strobes and the siren.”

Having proved my point, I click on the ‘X’ to close the window.

Now we arrive at a pit stop, Oedipa Maas in third person in Thomas Pynchon’s 1966 ‘The Crying of Lot 49’:

“Oedipa considered giving him the finger to see what would happen. But she’d driven straight through, and all at once the fatigue of it had caught up with her. The clerk took her to a room with a reproduction of a Remedios Varo in it, through corridors gently curving as the streets of San Narciso, utterly silent. She fell asleep almost at once, but kept waking from a nightmare about something in the mirror, across from her bed. Nothing specific, only a possibility, nothing she could see. When she finally did settle into sleep, she dreamed that Mucho, her husband, was making love to her on a soft white beach that was not part of any California she knew. When she woke in the morning, she was sitting bolt upright, staring into the mirror at her own exhausted face.”

We’ve traveled back in time in a way that a cut into a spool of yarn makes multiple strands, the ends marking the incision of a line of sight. Stay with me here. Along these lines form a liminality, the cut is a macro museum without walls containing ‘phatic images’ of Paul Virilio’s Vision Machine that are like blades of a propeller, that when applying the stroboscopic effect at various sampling rates, aliasing produces an optical glitch of reverse rotation or even standstill.

We’re stuntin’ one minute and the shit hits the fan the next. This isn’t a paper. It’s 1999 and Ray Kurzweil, in ‘The Spiritual Machine’ writes about art in 2029:

“Cybernetic artists in all of the arts—musical, visual, literary, virtual experience, and all others—no longer need to associate themselves with humans or organizations that include humans. Many of the leading artists are machines.”

Fuck that? Or…idk. Finally, getting closer to the present, Peter Sloterdijk in his 2009 ‘Rules for the Human Zoo’ writes (somewhat) about where we are right now:

“In the Clearing, as its most obvious marks, appear the houses of men (as well as the temples of their gods and the palaces of their masters). Historians of culture have made it clear that with domesticity the relationship between men and animals changed. With the taming of men by their houses the age of pets began as well.”

– S

Net Gallery
2525 w 7th street, Los Angeles


December 3-10, 2016 – NEUER AACHENER KUNSTVEREIN


Helene, 2016; Archival pigment print, 25×18 inches, edition 1/5 + 2AP

NAK Benefizauktion
December 3 – 10, 2016
Opening Reception: Saturday, December 10, 7-9pm

Boban Andjelkovic – Michelle Alperin – Johann Arens – Florian Auer – Wojciech Bakowski – Joachim Bandau – Horst H. Baumann – Boris Becker – Valentin Beinroth – Johannes Bendzulla – Benjamin Bergmann – Tim Berresheim – Eugenie Bongs – Beer – Lars Breuer – Andreas Breunig – Julia Bünnagel – Andreas Bunte – Sebastian Burger – Clara Brörmann – Raphael Thank you – Plamen Dejanoff – Andreas Diefenbach – Hansjoerg Dobliar – Matthias Dornfeld – Dan Dryer – Hannes Egger – Klaus Endrikat – Michael Gauder – Andreas Gloel – Andreas Greiner – Andreas Gretel – Ellen Gronemeyer – Selma Greta – Ulrich Hakel – Lone Haugaard Madsen – Gerard Hemsworth – Florian Heinke – Ilka Helmig – Benedict Hipp – Erika Hock – Jan Hoeft – Andy Hope 1930 – Res Ingold – Pauline Izumi Colin – Karl-Heinz Jeiter – Eleni Kamma – Andy Cashier – Thomas Kellner – Georg Kerl – Magdalena Kita – Halina Kliem – Wilhelm Klotzek – Alfons Knogl – Jody Korbach – Thomas Kratz – Caroline Lange – Alwin Lay – Christine Liebich – Sigrid von Lintig – Melissa Logan – Timur Lukas – Andreas Magdanz – Kris Martin – Rita McBride – Martin Mele – Roland Mertens – Philip Metz – Jenny Michel – Rune Mields – Zoë Claire Miller – Arjan Mirfendereski – Jonathan Monk – Karl von Monschau – Jochen Mura – Lukas Mueller – Murena Murena – Joe Neave – Bea Otto – Thomas Palme – Olga Pedan – Martin Arrows – Katrin Plavcak – Berthold Rei fl – Theresa Reusch – Bernd Ribbeck – Johanna Roderburg – Markus Saile – Julia Scheer – Jan Ole Schiemann – Florian Schmidt – Arne Schmitt – Ralph Schuster – Wilhelm Schurmann – Timo Seber – Oliver Sieber / Katja Stuke – Dominik Sittig – Kathrin Sunday – Vera Sous – Henrik Strömberg – Agnieszka Szostek – Emma Talbot – Wolfgang Tillmans – Britta Thie – Tim Trantenroth – Nora Turato – Hiroki Tsukuda – Luki from the Gracht – Thomas Virnich – Marta Volkova & Slava Shevenenko – Franz Wehrmacher – Thomas Weidenhaupt – Werner Wernicke – Achim F. Willems – Alex Wissel – Ralf Witthaus – Johannes Wohnseifer – Peter Wu – Haegue Yang

Neuer Aachener Kunstverein
Pass Straße 29, 52070 Aachen
neueraachenerkunstverein.de


November 12, 2016 – March 18, 2017 – VINCENT PRICE ART MUSEUM

RISE OF THE FLY II
Opening Reception: Saturday, November 12, 4-6pm

PRESS RELEASE

In a dynamic installation that spans the spaces of painting, video projection and sculpture, Peter Wu refreshes the themes from the science fiction classics “The Fly” (Kurt Neumann, 1958 and David Cronenberg, 1986) to explore the aesthetics of technology, and processes of transformation and translation. Throughout Rise of the Fly II, the artist culls and fractures movie footage from the original films to develop his own iconographies and to reposition and mediate that which is familiar through the lens of strange eyes.

Breaking from the linear narrative of cinema, the artist draws upon production stills from the films as source imagery to be metamorphosed through purposeful conversions and contaminations between artistic forms. Wu explores the possibilities of permutations between traditional media – film, video, installation, painting and sculpture – to compose works that generate a surreal, immersive adaptation to the original films. This contiguous interplay between physical and ephemeral media is mirrored in the premise of “The Fly,” a tragic hero mutating towards a human/insect hybrid through scientific exploration and experimentation with new technologies. Such a plot underscores the socio-historical backdrop of each film Wu cites: the fears of nuclear armament and destruction in the Cold War-era version of the film, and the fears of the degeneration of the body reflective of the first wave of the AIDS crisis in the 1980s. The repurposed imagery in Rise of the Fly II, sequenced and multiplied across layers of representation, inhabits both physical and mental spaces, while gesturing to abstraction between and across film and painting. In this way, the artist draws upon the genre of science fiction to signpost an estrangement associated with technological advancement and modernity, while questioning how memory and history can be reconstructed.

VINCENT PRICE ART MUSEUM
East Los Angeles College
1301 Avenida Cesar Chavez, Monterey Park, CA 91754
323 265 8841   vincentpriceartmuseum@elac.edu   vincentpriceartmuseum.org


November 14, 2015 – January 9, 2016 – GREENE EXHIBITIONS

November 14, 2015 – January 9, 2016
Opening Reception: Saturday, November 14, 6-9pm

“Telephones and telephone bells have always made me uneasy. Years ago, when they were mostly wall fixtures, I disliked them, but nowadays, when they are planted in every nook and corner, they are a downright intrusion. We have a saying in France that a coalman is master in his own house; with the telephone, that is no longer true, and I suspect that even the Englishman is no longer king in his own castle.” – George Langelaan “The Fly,” 1957

Anxiety. It is how George Langelaan begins his short story, “The Fly,” published for the first time in Playboy in June of 1957. With the successful launch of Sputnik only months away, the West would have another sign of the dreaded spread of communism and the Soviet ascent towards superiority in the world. The following summer, Kurt Neumann’s film based on Langelaan’s short story premiers in San Francisco. The story revolves around an inventor who has created a machine that includes two chambers: one that disintegrates matter that is instantaneously transported across space to a second chamber that perfectly reintegrates and restores it to its original form. Langelaan’s characters wonder if this may be the most important modern invention until a fly is trapped in the disintegration chamber with the scientist as he attempts to teleport himself. The two bodies are fused together and a hybrid being is created: The Fly.

In David Cronenberg’s 1986 “The Fly,” the anxiety of the nuclear age and a Soviet takeover was replaced by the fear of our vulnerability to disease. In the year prior to the film’s release, at least one HIV case had been diagnosed in each region of the world. Cronenberg updates the previous film’s disintegration/reintegration chambersto prominently feature the scanning and recording of a living being’s composition to include the structure of its DNA. The audience witnesses The Fly develop from an initially undetectable corruption of its body’s genetic material. The genius is patient zero.

For the artist’s third solo exhibition with the gallery, Peter Wu has created a sequel to the original “The Fly” films, which continues his practice of pursuing the potential of recontextualized signs. “Rise of the Fly” dematerializes the images, sounds, scores, and themes of the original films into a reconstituted body using the language of cinematic montage and painting. The paintings are precisely illuminated by projections intermittently integrated with Wu’s sequences of video montages. The fallen hero of The Fly is absent save for its fragmented image throughout the paintings, projecting the contemporary anxiety of having a window into everywhere that you are, and most saliently are not.

GREENE EXHIBITIONS
1639 S. La Cienega Blvd. Los Angeles, CA 90035
310 876 0532    info@greene-exhibitions.com
greene-exhibitions.com


November 3 – 9, 2015 – PIASA

BLOODY RED SUN OF FANTASTIC L.A.
Curated by René-Julien Praz
November 3 – 9, 2015

Los Angeles has long defended its claim as a cultural capital of the world. From the development of its museums to its cradle of creativity that has catapulted the likes of Chris Burden, John Baldessari, and James Turrell to fame, the city’s artistic institutions are second to none — yet it is often seen in the shadow of other global destinations.

On November 3-9, French auction house Piasa will bring the City of Angels to the City of Light in a sale devoted to emerging artists from the Los Angeles scene shown for the first time in France. Curated by René-Julien Praz, an arts figure with a history of nurturing Angeleno artists, the exhibition will feature work by Joe Reihsen, Matthew Carter, Molly Larkey, Ben Wolf Noam, Joshua Nathanson, and Amir Nikravan, among others.

Titled “Bloody Red Sun of Fantastic L.A.,” the exhibition takes its name from Jake Elliot’s 2014 short story, derived from his favorite Doors’ song. Said Praz, “Once I’d thought of the title, Bloody Red Sun of Fantastic L.A., nothing could seem more fitting. The sheer wealth of images that these words evoke portrays with surgical precision the pathos of this mythical city, where glamour meets vulgarity and highbrow culture, the mainstream. Only in L.A. could kitsch rub shoulders with the sublime and seduction with repulsion: this city truly is a world of contrasts.”

It is the city of contrasts that Praz aims to capture with his curation, selecting artists both established and emerging, who have greatly influenced the city’s creative trajectory in recent years.

PIASA
118 rue du Faubourg Saint-Honoré 75008 Paris – France
piasa.fr


June 13 – July 25, 2015 – GREENE EXHIBITIONS

June 13 – July 25, 2015
Opening Reception: Saturday, June 13, 6-9pm

JOHN ANDREW | CARMEN ARGOTE | SKIP ARNOLD | YORK CHANG | OLIVER CLEGG
JUSTIN COLE | VANESSA CONTE | DORIT CYPIS | MICHAEL DOPP | MARCEL DUCHAMP
IVO EADWULF | OLIVIA ERLANGER | SCOTT EASTWOOD | PETER FEND
AARON GARBER-MAIKOVSKA | TOBIAS HANTMANN | MARCUS HERSE | JESSE HLEBO
MICHAEL KENNEDY COSTA | JULIE KIRKPATRICK | JOOST KRIJNEN | SOFIA LEIBY
SONIA LEIMER | KAREN LIEBOWITZ | ROMAN LIŠKA | SEBASTIAN LUDWIG | CARLY MARK
CHRISTIAN MAYER | ANA MAZZEI | LUCAS MICHAEL | CHRISTOPHER MICHLIG
KAVERI NAIR | GINA OSTERLOH | JULIANA PACIULLI | ISAAC RESNIKOFF
LAURA RIBOLI | RICARDO RIVERA | EMANUEL RÖHSS | JUSTIN THOMAS SCHAEFER
LEANDER SCHWAZER | MATT SHERIDAN SMITH | JULIAN STALBOHM | JESSIE STEAD
NICK THEOBALD | STEPHANIE WASHBURN | BENJAMIN WEISSMAN | JENNIFER WEST
CONSTANZE WIATER | CHLOE WISE | PETER WU | ERIC YAHNKER

GREENE EXHIBITIONS
1639 S. La Cienega Blvd. Los Angeles, CA 90035
310 876 0532    info@greene-exhibitions.com
greene-exhibitions.com


May 14 – 17, 2015 – NADA NEW YORK

YORK CHANG | AARON GARBER-MAIKOVSKA | ALICE TIPPIT | PETER WU

GREENE EXHIBITIONS
NADA NEW YORK 2015
greene-exhibitions.com


April 29, 2015 – KCHUNG RADIO


January 29 – February 1, 2015 – ART LOS ANGELES CONTEMPORARY

OLIVIA ERLANGER | CHRISTIAN MAYER | PETER WU

GREENE EXHIBITIONS
ART LOS ANGELES CONTEMPORARY
greene-exhibitions.com


October 23 – November 23, 2014 – PARKHAUS im MALKASTENPARK

MARCUS GARBER WU

Opening Reception: Thursday, October 23, 7PM

AARON GARBER-MAIKOVSKA

MARCUS HERSE

PETER WU

PARKHAUS im MALKASTENPARK
Jacobistraße 6a | 40211 Düsseldorf
parkhaus-duesseldorf.com

 


October 6 – November 2, 2014 – GUGGENHEIM GALLERY AT CHAPMAN UNIVERSITY

LIFE TRANSMISSIONS

Artist Reception & Catalogue Release: Sunday, November 2, 3PM-7PM

BAS JAN ADER | SARAH BOSTWICK | JOSHUA CALLAGHAN | MEGAN DAALDER

KARL HAENDEL | MARY KELLY| JOHN MILLS | JED OCHMANEK

GINA OSTERLOH | ROBERT RAUSCHENBERG | PETER WU

CURATED BY MARCUS HERSE

Art never expresses anything but itself.
Oscar WildeI feel like I’m too busy writing history to read it.
Kanye West

The Guggenheim Gallery at Chapman University is pleased to present LIFE TRANSMISSIONS.
Please join us for the artist reception and catalog release on Sunday November 2, 2014 from 3-7PM.

The question of what is at the beginning of things – paralleling the metaphor of the chicken and the egg – is negotiated in this exhibition. Is it life that inspires our creative production, or is it precisely art and our creations that enable us to recognize and maneuver the world? The exhibition looks at interdependencies and correlations between these views, and presents a line up of positions that mine this interstice via indexical, mimetic, linguistic, and semiotic tactics.

An old ideal of art and its beauty is that of the perfect illusion. The legendary competition between the ancient Greek painters Zeuxis and Parrhasios illustrates this: Here Zeuxis’s skills with the brush create such a remarkable copy of reality that a flock of doves is trying to pick the painted grapes. Zeuxis however, inspecting his opponent’s work and attempting to remove the curtain that obstructs Parrhasios’s painting, finds out that the joke is on him, as the curtain is in fact part of the work, so masterfully executed that even the great Zeuxis does not recognize it as an illusion.

On the other hand of the spectrum is a view, which the age of enlightenment first introduced, that left a lasting mark on art ever since the project of modernity came into full swing: Art does not mimic the natural world. This view, once a liberation from old doctrines, proposed l’art pour l’art, the autonomous artwork, freed from the burden of illustration, narration and possibly all other relationality.

So far so good, but in a non-centrical art universe, neither one of these views can be said to dominate our ideas of what art is supposed to be and do. In view of a reality of life that itself has become abstracted, in which the list has replaced the picture, where can a distinction be made between a given, non-negotiable ‘reality’ and the realities we create? How close can art get to life before it disappears into the same?

GUGGENHEIM GALLERY AT CHAPMAN UNIVERSITY
One University Drive, Orange, CA 92866
chapman.edu


September 20 – November 21, 2014 – FELLOWS OF CONTEMPORARY ART

ITCH SCRATCH SCAR

Opening reception: Saturday, September 20, 6 to 9pm

SHIVE ALIABADI | MARIEL CARRANZA | YORK CHANG | FINISHING SCHOOL

MARC HOROWITZ | KOHL KING | ALEVE MEI LOH | CHRISTINE NGUYEN

YOSHI SAKAI | KIKI SEROR | CHRISTIAN TEDESCHI | CODY TREPTE

PATRICIA VALENCIA | EMMETT WALSH | PETER WU

CURATED BY KOHL KING & ALEVE MEI LOH

Fellows of Contemporary Art proudly presents Itch Scratch Scar as their final exhibition for the 2014 Curators Lab series. Curated by Kohl King and Alevé Mei Loh, Itch Scratch Scar will feature the work of 15 Los Angeles based artists whose works are substantially rich in process and investigate and interpret the theme of impulse, action and fulfillment.

Historically, during 1880s-1920s it was observed that the cultural hallmarks of boredom, cynicism and pessimism lead to the rejection of social order and traditional values, which, in turn, impacted artistic philosophy and production.

Similarly over the period thus far from 1980, there has been extensive political change, environmental degradation, technological advancement and economic inflation and turmoil. The current generation describes a world that has gotten smaller and time is perceived to have sped up. The exponential ripple effects of all these factors have left many with a deep unshakeable feeling that the world may not experience the dawn of a new century; and yet, within this unrest, artists still answer to the need to create and leave a mark in whatever ways possible, while still sustaining their existence.

As we head towards 2020, the theme of Itch Scratch Scar is to survey current artists who are actively engaged in capturing the relevant narratives of the epoch either through subject matter, choice of materials or genre.

FELLOWS OF CONTEMPORARY ART
970 N. Broadway, Suite 206, Los Angeles, CA 90012
focala.org

 


February 19 – March 14, 2014 – 308 at 156 PROJECT ART SPACE


January 11 – February 15, 2014 – GREENE EXHIBITIONS

THEY KISSED IN IAMBIC PENTAMETER
Opening Saturday, January 11, 6 to 8pm

Between the crooked discourse and willing shapes.
With sixty seven words, eight realizations.
Escape by route unplanned, the needle split…
Discard the cinder blocks, and sing sweet prose.
The patterns double as I taste your smile.
The cold did wrench her stomach, hearts entwined.
A song of love, a flask, a cave, your stare.
– Samantha Rae Wu

GREENE EXHIBITIONS
2654 La Cienega Ave.
Los Angeles, CA 90034
T: 310 876 0532
info@greene-exhibitions.com
www.greene-exhibitions.com

 


 

November 23 – December 21, 2013 – HIGHLAND HOUSE

HOSTILE HOSPITALITY

MATTHEW CARTER | STEVEN FROST | GIRL PUKE | MICHELLE CARLA HANDEL

KYLA HANSEN | MICHELE JAQUIS | ZACH KLEYN | ALEXANDER KROLL | LIZ NURENBERG

DOMINIC QUAGLIOZZI | CHRIS REYNOLDS | TESSIE WHITMORE | PETER WU

CURATED BY CHRISTY ROBERTS

Opening reception: Saturday, November 23, 6 to 11pm
Closing reception: Saturday, December 21, 6 to 11pm

HIGHLAND HOUSE
756 Highland Ct., Upland, CA 91786
highlandhouse.org

 


 

October 26, 2013 – DORIT CYPIS & PETER WU
“Can ‘i’ be Dropped From History?” Panel Discussion

VOLLEY
Four weeks of artist talks, screenings, and performances

“Can ‘i’ Be Dropped From History?”
Saturday, October 26, 4pm

What are some considerations on authorship, identity, history, and dialogue when individual artists work in response to one another? Artists Dorit Cypis and Peter Wu will discuss this question moderated by curator and art historian Claire de Dobay Rifelj. Videos of the artist’s collaboration will be on view during the panel.

This panel is made possible, in part, through the support of the YoYoYo Grant,
a part of the Los Angeles Initiative of the Rema Hort Mann Foundation.

GREENE EXHIBITIONS
2654 La Cienega Ave.
Los Angeles, CA 90034
T: 310 876 0532
info@greene-exhibitions.com
www.greene-exhibitions.com

 


 

July 2013 – CCF FELLOWSHIP FOR VISUAL ARTISTS

Peter Wu is a proud recipient of the 2013 California Community Foundation Fellowship for Visual Artists.

 

 


 

July 20 – August 24, 2013 – GREENE EXHIBITIONS

July 20 – August 24, 2013
Opening Reception: Saturday, July 20, 6-9pm

HEIMIR BJÖRGÚLFSSON | YORK CHANG | DORIT CYPIS | MICHAEL DECKER | AARON GARBER-MAIKOVSKA

DAN GRAHAM | MARCUS HERSE | JOHN KNUTH | INDIA LAWRENCE | CANDICE LIN | LISA MADONNA

CALVIN MARCUS | DAVID MCDONALD | AMIR NIKRAVAN | JULIANA PACIULLI | PAUL PESCADOR

RAYMOND PETTIBON | MARNIE WEBER | AARON WRINKLE | PETER WU

In 1974, Amos Tversky and Daniel Kahneman published Judgement Under Uncertainty: Heuristics and Biases in Science magazine. The result of five years of collaboration, testing, and research has since been cited by hundreds of scholarly articles as recent as 2010. Tversky and Kahneman’s prolific research, collaboration, and publishing lasted until 1996, when Tversky passed at the age of 59. In 2002, their work earned the Nobel Prize in Economic Sciences. Frequently labeled as psychologists, their work is considered by many to be the beginning of the field of Behavioral Economics, a label that Kahneman dismisses.

The continuation of their research through the 80’s and 90’s showed emotions to be increasingly important in the decision making process. Rational decision making, the first rule of all economic modeling, also came into question under these additional findings. Tversky and Kahneman’s heuristics, such as “framing,” “availability,” and “anchoring” showed how decisions or personal observations are influenced more by recent experience, or even proximity to time and space. “Folding Time Rhymes” presents the art of 20 artists within a framework that acknowledges the natural tendency to seek novelty through the narrow gate of personal experience and the canon of art history. The exhibition is homage to Tversky and Kahneman, exploring how their work relates to the way art that is experienced.

GREENE EXHIBITIONS
2654 La Cienega Ave.
Los Angeles, CA 90034
T: 310 876 0532
info@greene-exhibitions.com
www.greene-exhibitions.com

 


 

June 7 – July 7, 2013 – ZIC ZERP Gallery

Chris Badger, Chromium Dumb Belle, Alison Blickle, Brian Butler, Amanda Charchian, Brian Cooper, Tracy Conti, Sarah Cromarty, Michael Decker Astral Eyes, Amir H. Fallah, Francesca Gabbiani, Daniel Hope, Pearl C. Hsiung, Doug Harvey, Charles Irvin, Dennis Koch & Talitha Wall, Karen Liebowitz, Klea McKenna, Alison O’Daniel, Christina Ondrus, Corrina Peipon, Brian Randolph, Ron Rege jr, Ewoud van Rijn, Eddie Ruscha, Amy Sarkisian, Jim Shaw, Claude Collins-Stracensky, Thaddeus Strode, Dani Tull, Eric Yahnker, Landon Wiggs, Chris Wilder, Peter Wu, Taylor Zepeda 

ZIC ZERP Gallery is pleased to announce The Archaic Revival, a group exhibition curated by Los Angeles-based artist Dani Tull.

The exhibition features mostly works on paper and smaller works by 35 established and emerging artists from Los Angeles, Portland, and Rotterdam whose works can be considered as manifestations of a burgeoning dialogue from within the collective subconscious of contemporary art. The artists in the exhibition use allegorical code, sacred plant knowledge, magic and an untethered glossolalia, while their works intuit mysticism, alchemy, fetishistic processes, prophecy, and even humor.

The artists of The Archaic Revival call upon their ancestors to find their footing into the future, a future that is undoubtedly becoming stranger and more uncertain. And as humanity ponders the possibility of its own extinction, we find ourselves reaching back through history and mythology to find a greater affinity with our own genesis.
-Dani Tull, Curator/Artist

Opening reception on June 7, 6 to 9pm

ZIC ZERP Gallery
Van Oldenbarneveltstraat 120A
Rotterdam, Netherlands

 


 

June 6, 2013 – PRINTROOM

 


 

February 1 – March 10, 2013 – JAUS

For this exhibition artists have created predominantly all white works, a choice which creates visual unity and evokes a sense of harmony, weightlessness, and freedom. However when examined on closer level it is apparent that all these works have contradictory elements working within and amongst each other that push and pull the viewer in opposing directions. These works are investigations of where states of being, matter, air and light cross over.

“It’s an incredibly loaded subject- this diaphanous soup we live in…It feels primeval- there’s a sense of the undifferentiated, the non hierarchical  It’s not exactly a dramatic light. In fact, ‘dramatic’ is exactly what it’s not. If anything it’s meditative. And there’s something really peculiar about it… you get confronted with a strong contrasting duality: illumination and opacity. But when you have the kind of veiled light we get here more regularly you become aware of a sort of multiplicity – not illumination so much as luminosity. Southern California glows… the opacity melts away into translucency, and even transparency.”

– Coy Howard, Architect, as quoted by Lawrence Weschler in “LA Glows”,
The New Yorker, Feb. 23rd 1998.

 


 

January 2013 – THE REMA HORT MANN FOUNDATION

Peter Wu is honored to be nominated for The Rema Hort Mann Foundation Los Angeles Emerging Artists Grant.

 


 

January 2013 – FABRIK MAGAZINE

Make sure to pick up the current copy of Fabrik Magazine, which features the second installment of 5790projects‘ “Emergent Presence: 8 LA Artists You Should Know,” written by Matthew Gardocki and Catlin Moore. The column features LIz Craft, Natalie Labriola, Annie Lapin, Annelie McKenzie, Dylan Palmer, April Street, Peter Wu, and Eric Yahnker.

 


October 27 – December 15, 2012 – GREENE EXHIBITIONS

Greene Exhibitions proudly presents Shed No Tears for Broken Nails, its first solo exhibition with the artist Peter Wu. The artist will feature new works from his FFF and Zzyzx Rd. series, as well as introduce a new body of sound and sculpture works, Substantia Alba.

Beginning with his latest series, Substantia Alba (in medical parlance: the name for white nerve tissue that connects the brain and spinal cord), the artist creates an excavation site for his memory. Fragments of the past break free from the plaster like a Pompeian villa: the walls from his family-run restaurant, beloved tchotchkes, and other shapes are intermingled amongst the structure. Some are clear; others have lost much of their profile, or have been disfigured through the impacts that expose them.

Accompanying the central excavation/sculpture is the sound of Wu’s voice, recorded in 1998, recounting a memory from his childhood that frames the tone of the entire exhibition. The hero of the story, Wu’s father, passes along a small but significant trinket to the artist. Even though the years and several moves across the continent have claimed the object itself, the memory’s effect is undiminished. The interplay between the central work and the story emanates across the entire gallery, raising questions about the difference in meaning between objects that are and are not present.

The latest updates to the Zzyzx Rd. series emerge from the playfulness and puns of the previous series to focus on the poetics of Wu’s arrangements. There are fewer identifiable moves, but each gesture is a bolder commitment to the object’s integrity. This preservation of the elements advances Wu’s investigations into how memories can be both reimagined and reconstructed.

The latest additions to the FFF series completes the artist’s dialectic of memory and material. The works succinctly state key elements of the entire exhibition: fragments of memory, familiar shapes of the past, and the passage of time that robs the past of its authentic detail. In “Shed No Tears for Broken Nails”, Wu renews the objects of the past, giving them a new life to haunt the present.

For more information please contact the gallery at + 1 323 876 0532 or info@greene-exhibitions.com


October 22, 2012 – Los Angeles I’m Yours